New Hampshire’s Traffic Violation Point System

How a traffic violation can lead to license suspension under New Hampshire’s demerit point system.

New Hampshire established a traffic violation point system to identify problematic drivers. Every traffic violation conviction is reported to the New Hampshire Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV), and most violations are assigned a number of points. Accumulation of too many points will result in license suspension.

How Points Are Acquired and Reduced

Here are the points assigned to some of the most common traffic offenses.

Violation

Points Assessed

No registration in possession

1

Failure to obtain resident license

1

No registration

2

Failure to display license

2

License restriction violation

2

Improper license class

2

Operating motorcycle without license

2

Disobey police officer

2

Littering

2

Disobey traffic control device

3

Wrong way on one-way street or roundabout

3

Following too closely

3

Driving on sidewalk

3

Failure yield right-of-way

3

Failure to yield to emergency vehicles

3

Failure to use due care

3

Failure to signal for turn

3

Railroad crossing violation

3

Speeding less than 25 miles per hour over limit

3

Coasting

3

Carrying passengers in truck bed

3

Driving without a license

4

Improper passing

4

Speeding more than 25 miles per hour over limit

4

No insurance

4

Negligent driving

4

Vehicular homicide, assault, or manslaughter

6

Driving while suspended

6

Joyriding

6

Racing

6

Reckless driving

6

Driving under the influence

6

Driving while in possession of drugs

6

Multiple violations arising out of the same occurrence will result in only a single assessment of points.

Reducing Your Points

Point expiration. The DMV stops counting the points for an offense three years after the violation date.

Point credits. A driver can reduce his or her point total by three points by voluntarily completing a driver improvement course. Drivers can get the reduction only once every three years.

Consequences of Accumulating Too Many Points

Generally, the accumulation of points will result in a warning letter from the DMV explaining the point system. If the driver acquires a certain number of points, the DMV will issue an “order to appear” for hearing. At the hearing, the administrative hearing officer will review the driver’s file and determine the length of the suspension. A hearing may not be required for suspensions under six months. The suspension length depends on the age of the driver and the number of accumulated points.

A driver under the age of 18 years old will be suspended for:

  • Up to three months for having six points in one year
  • Up to six months for having 12 points in two years, and
  • Up to one year for having 18 points in three years.

A driver over 18 but under 21 years old will be suspended for:

  • Up to three months for having nine points in one year
  • Up to six months for having 15 points in two years, and
  • Up to one year for having 21 points in three years.

A driver over 21 years old will be suspended for:

  • Up to three months for having 12 points in one year
  • Up to six months for having 18 points in two years, and
  • Up to one year for having 24 points in three years.

Driver attitude program. Suspended drivers are also required to complete a “driver attitude” program. This program is similar to the driver improvement course but is six to eight hours in length and does not remove any points.

Talk to a Lawyer

Need a lawyer? Start here.

How it Works

  1. Briefly tell us about your case
  2. Provide your contact information
  3. Choose attorneys to contact you
Get Professional Help

Talk to a Traffic Ticket attorney.

How It Works

  1. Briefly tell us about your case
  2. Provide your contact information
  3. Choose attorneys to contact you