Illinois’s Traffic Violation Point System

The points and license-related penalties associated with traffic tickets in Illinois.

In Illinois, a traffic ticket generally results in fines and fees. However, most driving-related violations also lead to driver’s license demerit points. These points are used by the state to identify drivers who may be a danger on the roadway. License-related penalties result if a driver acquires too many points within a certain period of time.

Point Values for Traffic Violations

Here are the points assigned to some of the most common traffic violations.

Violation

Points assessed

No CDL (commercial license) in possession

50

Texting or cellphone use in commercial vehicle

20

Disobeying an officer

10

Disregard traffic light or signal

20

Failure to report collision

25 (50 points if injury)

Failure to notify of property damage

15

Open container

25

Reckless driving

55

Screeching tires

10

Excess speed for conditions

10

Speeding 1 to 10 miles per hour over limit

5

Speeding 11 to 14 miles per hour over limit

15

Speeding 15 to 25 miles per hour over limit

20

Speeding more than 25 miles per hour over limit

50

Speeding in school or work zone

20

Driving too slow

5 (20 if on tollway)

Speeding on bridge

10

Improper passing

20

Wrong way on one-way street

5

Following too closely

25

Improper turn

10

Improper U-turn

15

Improper signal or failure to yield

15

Failure to yield to a pedestrian

20

Broken headlight, taillight, or other equipment

5

Use of video or phone that results in injury

30

Consequences of Accumulating Too Many Points

Illinois has a multi-stage point system based on the driver’s age, number of prior suspensions in the last seven years, and types of prior suspensions.

Drivers Who Are 21 and Older

Drivers who are at least 21 years old are subject to the following penalties after obtaining three or more traffic violation convictions within 24 months.

Points

No prior suspensions

One prior suspension

Two prior suspensions (or suspension for no insurance)

0 to 14

No action

No action

No action

15 to 44

2-month suspension

4-month suspension

12-month suspension

45 to 74

6-month suspension

6-month suspension

12-month suspension

75 to 89

6-month suspension

12-month suspension

12-month suspension

90 to 99

9-month suspension

12-month suspension

12-month suspension

100 to 109

12-month suspension

12-month suspension

12-month suspension

110 or more

Revocation

Revocation

Revocation

Drivers Who Are Younger Than 21

Drivers who are under 21 years old face similar penalties to older drivers. However, a suspension can occur after only two traffic violation conviction within 24 months.

Points

No prior suspensions

One prior suspension

Two prior suspensions (or suspension for no insurance)

0 to 9

No action

No action

No action

10 to 34

1-month suspension

2-month suspension

12-month suspension

35 to 49

3-month suspension

6-month suspension

12-month suspension

50 to 64

6-month suspension

12-month suspension

12-month suspension

65 to 79

12-month suspension

12-month suspension

12-month suspension

80 or more

Revocation

Revocation

Revocation

Notice

If the Illinois Department of Motor Vehicles finds that a driver is subject to suspension, it will issue a notice of revocation. However, all drivers are permitted to request a hearing and contest the grounds for suspension or revocation.

Restricted License

A hearing officer that affirms the suspension is authorized to issue a restricted license to a driver that shows undue hardship from a suspension. The license will be limited to operation to and from school, work, and medical appointments.

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