Speeding Tickets and Penalties in Hawaii

How Hawaii’s speeding limits work and the consequences of getting a speeding ticket.

Hawaii has two types of speeding laws: a “basic speeding rule” and maximum speed limits. This article explains the differences between the two and the consequences of a speeding violation.

Basic Speeding Law

Hawaii’s basic speeding rule prohibits driving at a speed greater than is “reasonable and prudent” under the circumstances. The basic speeding rule requires drivers to take into account all current conditions and existing hazards such as weather, traffic, visibility, and the like.

Maximum Speed Limits

Hawaii’s maximum speed limits are straightforward—if you exceed the maximum limit, you’ve violated the law and can be ticketed. Maximum speed limits should be posted and generally apply to all drivers. However, in addition to the posted limits, Hawaii imposes a maximum speed limit on mopeds of 35 miles per hour.

Penalties for a Speeding Ticket

Typical speeding tickets. The consequences of a speeding violation depend on the circumstances. Generally, the fines for a speeding ticket are:

  • up to $200 for a first violation
  • up to $300 for a second within a year, and
  • up to $500 for a third or subsequent violation within a year.

There’s also a $10 surcharge added to tickets involving a speed of more than ten miles per hour over the limit.

School and construction zones. The fine for speeding in a school or construction zone is $250 plus a surcharge of $100 (construction zone) to $125 (school zone).

Excessive speeding. Motorists who are caught driving 80 miles per hour or faster or exceeding a speed limit by at least 35 miles per hour can be cited for “excessive speeding”—a petty misdemeanor. The penalties for excessive speeding include:

  • First offense. A first violation within five years carries a fine of $500 to $1,000, surcharges of up to $125, license suspension of up to 30 days, and 36 hours of community service or 48 hours to five days in jail.
  • Second offense. A second violation within five years carries a fine of $750 to $1,000, surcharges of up to $125, a mandatory 30-day license suspension, and at least 120 hours of community service or five to 14 days in jail.
  • Third offense. A third violation within five years carries a fine of $1,000, surcharges of up to $125, license revocation of 90 days to one year, and ten to 30 days in jail.

All drivers convicted of excessive speed also must complete an assessment for driver education and complete an instruction in driving retraining course.

Reckless Driving and Vehicular Homicide

If a speeding violation involves a “reckless” “disregard of the safety of persons or property,” the driver can be charged with reckless driving. And if a speeding violation leads to the death of another person, negligent (vehicular) homicide charges are a possibility.

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