Connecticut Speeding Laws

Read about Connecticut’s speeding laws and the consequences of getting a speeding ticket.

Connecticut has a “basic speeding law” and “absolute speed limits.” Motorists who violate either of these can be cited for speeding. Here’s how the two types of limits work and the penalties of getting a speeding ticket in Connecticut.

Basic Speeding Law

Connecticut’s basic speeding law prohibits driving at a speed “greater than is reasonable, having regard to the width, traffic and use of highway, road or parking area, the intersection of streets and weather conditions.” In other words, motorists must always drive at a speed that’s safe given the current conditions. So, driving below the posted speed limit doesn’t necessarily shield a motorist from getting a speeding ticket.

The official label for a violation of the basic speed limit is “traveling unreasonably fast.” The offense is an infraction.

Absolute Speed Limits

With absolute speed limits, it’s pretty simple—if you drive faster than the absolute speed limit, you’ve violated the law.

In Connecticut, the state-wide maximum speed limit is 65 miles per hour. The 65-mile-per-hour limit applies to most rural state freeways. Speed limits in urban residential and business districts are normally 25 miles per hour, while the limits on urban freeways generally range from 45 to 55 miles per hour.

Penalties for a Speeding Ticket

The consequences of a speeding violation generally depend on the type of violation (absolute limit or unreasonably fast), how much faster than the speed limit the motorist was driving, and where the violation took place. But typically, a speeding ticket will lead to fines and driver's license points.

Absolute Limit Violations

For absolute limit violations, the fines and fees are generally the following:

  • 1 to 9 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $137 ($157 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 10 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $142 ($162 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 11 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $146 ($166 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 12 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $152 ($172 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 13 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $156 ($176 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 14 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $162 ($182 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 15 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $166 ($186 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 16 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $171 ($191 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 17 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $176 ($196 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 18 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $181 ($201 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 19 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $185 ($205 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 20 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $191 ($211 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 21 miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $195 ($215 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • 22 or more miles per hour over the limit. Fines and fees total $201 ($221 if speed at least 56 miles per hour).
  • Driver’s actual speed 71 to 75 miles per hour. Fines and fees total $223.
  • Driver’s actual speed 76 to 80 miles per hour. Fines and fees total $264.
  • Driver’s actual speed 81 to 85 miles per hour. Fines and fees total $304.
  • Driver’s actual speed 86 miles per hour or more (considered “reckless driving”). Fines and fees total $323.

Unsafe Speed (Basic Limit) Violations

For traveling an unsafe speed that’s lower than the posted limit, the fines and fees generally total $137.

Enhanced Fines for Violations in Certain Zones and Underage Drivers

For violations that occur in a school, construction, traffic, or fire station zone, the total amount the driver has to pay will typically be about $50 to $90 more than the amounts listed above.

Drivers who are under the age of 18 and are caught exceeding the limit by more than 20 miles per hour may also face increased fine amounts.

Other Possible Charges

A speeding violation that endangers the lives of others, puts others at significant risk, or involves a speed of over 85 miles per hour can be charged as “reckless driving.” However, a driver can’t be convicted of both speeding and reckless driving for the same incident.

Also, if a speeding violation leads to the deal of another person, “negligent-homicide-with-a-motor-vehicle” charges are a possibility.

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