Nevada’s Cellphone-Use & Texting-While-Driving Laws

Read about Nevada’s distracted driving laws and the costs of a violation.

Nevada’s distracted driving law prohibits motorists from driving while texting or using a handheld phone. Here’s what the law says, including its exceptions.

Texting While Driving

Nevada’s texting-while-driving law says that no motorist while operating a vehicle can use a cellphone or other handheld wireless communication device to:

  • enter or type text
  • send or read data
  • search the internet, or
  • engage in nonvoice communication with another person such as texting, electronic messaging (email), and instant messaging.

Basically, the law prohibits wireless device that requires the driver to use a hand or look away from the road.

Talking on the Phone While Driving

Nevada’s distracted driving also prohibits handheld cellphone use while driving. Drivers can use a phone for voice communications only if the device is in voice-operated mode. However, drivers can use their hands for the limited purpose of activating, deactivating, or initiating a function of the device.

Exceptions

Nevada’s distracted driving restrictions don’t apply to:

  • emergency service workers (such as firefighters and police) using a device within the scope of their duties
  • any person using a device in a situation that requires immediate action to protect the safety or well-being of another person and stopping the vehicle would be inadvisable, impractical, or dangerous
  • any person reporting a medical emergency or criminal activity
  • public utility workers using a device within the scope of their duties in an emergency, or
  • using a voice-operated or affixed GPS or navigation system.

Generally, all the exceptions to handheld device use relate to emergency work and situations.

Distracted Driving Ticket Penalties

Distracted driving is a misdemeanor in Nevada. A conviction carries a fine of:

  • $50 for a first offense within seven years
  • $100 for a second offense within seven years, and
  • $250 for a third or subsequent offense within seven years.

The fines are doubled for violations that occur in work or pedestrian safety zones. A second or subsequent offense will also result in traffic violation demerit points.

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