Speeding Tickets and Penalties in Delaware

How Delaware’s speeding limits work and the consequences of getting a speeding ticket.

Delaware has several types of speeding laws: a “general speed restriction” and absolute limits. This article explains the differences between the two limits and the consequences of a speeding violation.

Delaware Speed Limits

Delaware’s general speed restriction (sometimes called a “basic speed rule”) prohibits motorists from driving faster than is “reasonable and prudent” based on current conditions. In other words, motorists must always drive a safe speed taking into consideration traffic, weather, visibility, and other potential hazards.

Delaware’s absolute speed limits are straightforward—if you exceed the maximum limit, you’ve violated the law and can be ticketed. The absolute speed limits include:

  • 25 miles per hour in business districts
  • 25 miles per hour in residential districts
  • 10 miles per hour in school zones
  • 50 miles per hour on two-lane roadways, and
  • 55 miles per hour on four-lane or divided roadways.

Absolute limits are typically posted.

Penalties for a Speeding Ticket

Generally, the fines for speeding violations are $20 for a first offense and $25 for a second or subsequent offense. In addition to these fines, the driver is required to pay:

  • Five to 15 miles per hour over the limit. $1 for each mile per hour over the limit (or $2 for each mile per hour over the limit on a second or subsequent offense)
  • 15 to 20 miles per hour over the limit. $2 for each mile per hour over the limit (or $3 for each mile per hour over the limit on a second or subsequent offense)
  • 20 or more miles per hour over the limit. $3 for each mile per hour over the limit (or $4 for each mile per hour over the limit on a second or subsequent offense)

Generally, fines are doubled for violations that occur in roadwork and construction zones.

A speeding violation will also add two to five points to a motorist’s driving record.

Depending on the situation, a speeding violation could also lead to reckless driving charges. And for speeding violations that involve fatalities, vehicular homicide charges are possible.

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