Maine’s Traffic Violation Point System

The violations that can lead to license suspension under Maine’s license demerit point system.

A traffic violation in Maine will typically result in fines and fees but can also lead to demerit points being assessed against the person’s driving record. Maine keeps track of these points and will issue a notice of suspension when a driver accumulates too many points.

Point Values for Traffic Tickets

The Secretary of State receives notice of and records all traffic violation convictions that occur in Maine. The points for a violation remain on the driver’s record for one year before expiring. The following list indicates the number of points for various violations.

Violation

Points Assessed

Driving while suspended

8

Driving in the wrong direction

6

Speeding 15 to 30 miles per hour over limit

6

Minor in possession of drugs or alcohol

6

Improper passing or lane change

6

Leaving scene of accident involving property damage

6

Violation of license restrictions

6

Speeding less than 15 miles per hour over limit

4

Excessive acceleration

4

Failure to yield to pedestrian or vehicle

4

Failure to obey stop sign or light

4

Imprudent driving or speed

4

Operating with obstructed view

4

Operating without a license

4

Headlight or signal violation

2

Traffic circle or railroad crossing violation

2

Failure to maintain lane or control

2

Tailgating

2

Improper turn

2

Driving too slowly

2

Littering

2

No headlights or taillights

2

Trucks following too closely

2

Unlisted traffic violation

2

Consequences of Getting Too Many Points

A driver who obtains six points within a year will receive a warning letter outlining the penalties that will result from future traffic violations. Once a driver reaches 12 points in a year, the Secretary of State will issue a notice of suspension. This notice informs the driver that his or her license will be suspended for up to 15 days, effective on the stated date. Generally, this maximum 15-day suspension applies for each point-earning violation that either puts the driver over 12 points for the year or adds to the driver’s total that was already over 12 for the year. However, drivers who are suspended three times within three years will be subject to an additional suspension of up to 120 days for any future traffic violations.

Reduced Points

As noted above, points expire after one year. Additionally, for each year a driver is traffic conviction-free, the Secretary of State will award a single point credit. Up to four point credits can be stored, which can be applied if and when the driver commits a point-earning offense.

Drivers can also earn three point credits by completing an approved driver improvement course. Drivers can participate in a course only once per year.

Appeal

Within ten days of the effective suspension date, the driver can submit a request for an administrative hearing. At the hearing, the driver can argue that the suspension is incorrect or that extenuating circumstances exist warranting leniency. The hearing officer is permitted to rescind, continue, modify, or extend the original suspension period based on the evidence presented.

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